¡Bienvenidos Bogotá!

I travel a lot with my job. And I’m guilty of taking that for granted every now and then – especially when it feels like I’m spending more time up in the air than on the ground. But being on lock down going on 3-weeks now, I’m really feeling grateful for all of the opportunities and experiences I’ve had “getting” to travel.

Social media reminded me this morning, that while I finally have the domesticated routine of waking up, making breakfast, brewing coffee and starting my very routine and structured (quarantined) day at home… I was bouncing around Bogota, Columbia on this day 11 years ago..


Bogota, Columbia – April 2009

How many people get to travel and teach at international training centers across the world?
And I always try to learn more about the places I go, like learning which artists are native to the area and seeing the popular sites that make the destination unique!
And there is no coffee like Columbian coffee… I fell in love with Juan Valdez coffee that day. I bought awesome coffee cups from that shop that I still use to this day!


I was so lucky to get to visit Columbia with not just a good friend of mine (and brilliant teacher) Debbie, but also had the best host and friend, Robert who made sure we got a great taste of Bogota and still teach and train coaches and athletes from the area.


The city of Bogota was really pretty. Even on a rainy day the architecture and use of color really made and impact.

I loved that even in a busy city, the luxury of outdoor space was still valued. Courtyards like these were a testament to the wealth of the families and businesses who took residence there.

The city streets of Columbia have a historic charm that we don’t have here in the US. I wish that we had narrower streets that limited the numbers of cars and increased the foot traffic that lends itself to more street food!

I would love to have a courtyard garden like this one day, built around the heart of our home.


While I don’t always understand Picasso, I can always appreciate his unique perspective.

We’re not taking it all in – we’re just sitting because we needed a break from walking…

This installation was haunting – serving Psycho & American Psycho vibes.

There was a series of modern art revolving around street signs and public signage that was really cool – Especially the blend of Spanish & English signage.


I was familiar with the “plump” style of Fernando Botero’s art but didn’t know his name or his history prior to this trip to the Botero Museum. After visiting the museum, I started to notice his influence all over the city in statues, directional signs and accents in architecture – all subtle nods to its local artist.


It was nice to learn more about the history of the country as well.

Learning about the indigenous people and their early ways of living was very interesting.

It was remarkable to learn how quickly technology and science can completely change the day to day lives of a society.

And makes you appreciate that their history and wonder how different things can change in 10, 20 and 30 years…




And in addition to site seeing and really getting the taste and feel of Bogota, Columbia – we had the honor of teaching and sharing our skills/talent (the purpose of the trip).


Like I mentioned above, we were lucky to have such amazing hosts to take care of us – and translate because… Mi español es muy malo!

I’m really grateful for the opportunity I had to travel – and be welcomed into a community to graciously!

And while my Spanish needs work – I nailed “Bienvenidos” and to this day, it’s how I always greet Robert when we get the chance to see eachother!

I’m thankful for these awesome experiences I’ve had and that social media continues to humble me with the opportunities I have been given.

My goal during this period of isolation and “quarantine” is to reflect more on the moments and experiences that we may take for granted. While I’m not allowed to travel right now – it’s a great opportunity to look back at where I’ve been!

¡Bienvenidos Bogotá!